What Logan Taught Me

I love movies. I love film.

I’m talking like L O V E. Not just watching films, but dissecting them. It’s the paying attention to the music in each scene, following the color schemes and patterns, discerning the camera angles and lighting and it’s impact on the overall moment. Watching movies, isn’t just watching movies for me. Maybe it’s the literature lover within me that can’t simply look at a work of creativity and take it as it is. Whatever the case, this is what brings me to this post.

Like I shared here, March was the month of just living. In the living, I went to see a LOT of movies---at least it felt like a lot. The first one of the month that I viewed was Logan. Now, I was apprehensive going into this film. Mainly because I filter the amount of rated R films I watch. I try hard to not make it a habit to watch simply because by default they are either heavy in violence, language, nudity/sex or all three. So, I work to limit how much I view films that are heavy in that kind of content. So, with Logan, I knew from the previews it was gonna be intense. It wasn’t your average X-men movie.

I can honestly say I found the film full of so much more than the action. Watching Logan, one gets to see a whole different side to a mainstream character. Logan follows a post-apocalyptic Wolverine---except there’s not much left to Wolverine. Logan unmasks a deeply loved persona and shows the man behind the superhero. Logan is raw, intense, pensive, and filled with dry humor (aka the best kind of humor). It’s honestly a stripping down of the idyllic view of superheroes.

We all know they aren’t real, but what I appreciated about Logan is that it showed the effects and affects of being a superhero. From a physically perspective to a mental and emotional perspective, we see what all the years of fighting as Wolverine has done to Logan. I mean, they follow this theme by a naming the film after Wolverine’s real name, not his persona.

Something that Logan showed me is that in doing all the “saving the world from bad guys” there’s a price to it all. There’s an impact on every front. To bring it back to reality, it makes me think of the people we consider our super heroes; the men and women who we feel day in and day out try and save the world and make it a better place. It makes me think hey, what we see on social media isn’t the whole story. We don’t know in detail what they’ve had to sacrifice, what they’ve struggled with or what they do struggle with. We don’t know the price they’ve paid to be where they are. It honestly challenges me to not judge so quickly; to not assume it’s always been an easy journey. It also helps me realize that they’re human too. They have struggles and vices. They have high moments and probably some really low ones. We honestly don’t know what the impact of their platform has on their lives whether good or bad.

Logan taught me that being a “superhero” doesn’t make you less human. In all honesty, it uncovers the most human parts of you. It also shows me that one is never too late for or far from redemption. It’s a beautiful reminder that even in your darkest place, even in your most vulnerable state, you can be powerful---you can make a difference.

BAH. Such gold.


What films have you watched that has challenged you or pushed you to see things differently?

 

 

Danae Carson is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of This Wondrous Life. With a passion for creativity, dreams, and community you will find in the content she creates an eagerness for others to be awaken to their dreams and creativity. When she isn't busy running This Wondrous Life, Danae can be found working a 9-5 in Washington, D.C. and when she's not there, she can be found making areopress coffee at home, brainstorming and dreaming up how to best live present with those around her. Danae resides in the suburbs of Maryland. To learn more about her and This Wondrous Life, you can follow the journey on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!